UD Moves to NE for a New Urban Experience

Artist's rendering of the new Grain Belt apartments, with the old brewery in the background.
Artist rendering of the Grain Belt apartments with the old brewery in the background.

UD welcomes a new apartment, new neighborhood and new NE Minneapolis!

After an enjoyable 18 months as North Loop residents, John and I will be moving on to our next urban living experience this coming week: Northeast Minneapolis.  The old Grain Belt brewery complex is beckoning us with the larger unit, more picturesque view and quieter, residential neighborhood experience that we’ve been craving.  One of the adventures of renting in an urban area with so much rental construction is having the option to live a slightly nomadic existence, trying out new neighborhoods and different types of apartment homes.

Last evening, we met friends for pizza and drinks at Psycho Suzie’s Motor Lodge, walked the neighborhood for a bit after and finally landed on the lush and lovely patio of Mojo Coffee Gallery in the California Building. (Delightful cup of cappuccino, by the way!)  Having lived in NE Minneapolis about 10 years ago, when it was first designated an “arts district” by the city, it was fun to reflect on the growth and changes in the neighborhood since then.

The northeast I knew 10 years ago was still populated by descendants of some the neighborhood’s original eastern European immigrants.  Churches were still sponsoring community events, in fact, I still have and use some of the hand-embroidered sack cloth towels I bought at a church bake sale, around the corner from the home I was living in at the time.  Art was just getting going in the neighborhood and Art-a-Whirl was starting to gain popularity.

What was awesome about living in the area back then was that there was some type of art gallery opening or event almost every weekend.  Attending these became a wonderful pastime to share with my daughter, who was 12 or 13 at the time.  Some of the galleries were located in spaces that had been long abandoned by industry, making them equally entertaining viewing, next to the art being featured.

Psycho Suzie’s was a much smaller prospect at that time. It was located in an old drive-in restaurant which is the present location of what I call Psycho Suzie’s II: Betty Danger’s.  Back then, the patio looked a lot like their present tiki bar, which feels like Gilligan’s Island, and the interior that always made me expect to meet Jack Lord in an episode of Hawaii 5-0. The bouncer, I remember fondly, as a tough but slight-of-build British biker gent, who, despite his diminutive size, kept everyone in line and managed an extremely tight parking lot. Like most people, I loved the blatant cheesiness of the whole thing, along with the amazing pizza the establishment still serves today.  The present Psycho Suzie’s location was a sports bar I frequented with friends, to munch fries over a beer and play an occasional game of pool.

It’s a new NE for me, and I’m very much looking forward to getting to know it, and my new neighbors.  UD welcomes your input on places to go and things to do in what has become the number one rated art’s district in the US!

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